How Cheap Are Stocks ?

Wednesday, April 09, 2008 | 07:07 AM

One of our intermediate concerns about equities involves valuations. While we recently made a short term buy call, that is merely a trade that could possibly run for a couple of weeks or months -- but not much longer. That call certainly wasn't made because stocks are such screaming bargains.

As to valuations: Its hard to really say that stocks are cheap here. At best, I believe we can argue that -- assuming that historically high earnings do not fade -- that stocks are not terribly expensive. But that is very different than saying they are cheap.

Have a look at this lovely table from Dow Jones Market Data Center:
>

Stocks Are Not Cheap
Dow_pe_and_yields

 

You can also see the Yields On Dow Stocks here (Thanks, Tim!)

>

These are not the sorts of valuations you find at the end of Bear markets.  And, James Montier points out a factoid that makes the above even worse: Analysts lag reality. James adds the damning observation that "They only change their minds when there is irrefutable proof they were wrong, and then only change their minds very slowly."

Have a look at his chart below: It is a linear time trend out of operating earnings and the analyst forecasts of those earnings (so the chart simply plots deviations from trend in $ per share terms).

Analysts_lag

>

As the red line in the chart shows, the earnings recession is just now beginning. But as the black line reveals, analysts have yet to lower their earnings numbers. Montier notes that the downgrading of estimates has been highly constrained to the financials (and to a lesser extent the consumer sector in the US for 2007).

Roughly speaking US earnings ex financials have been revised down by 1.5% compared to nearer 4% for the market as a whole.

Thus, our contention that markets have only priced in a short, shallow recession . . .




>


Source:
Asleep at the wheel, or, How I learned to stop worrying and love the bomb
James Montier
Apr 07 2008, 02:52 PM
http://www.investorsinsight.com/blogs/john_mauldins_outside_the_box/archive/2008/04/07/asleep-at-the-wheel-or-how-i-learned-to-stop-worrying-and-love-the-bomb.aspx


Related:
Schwab Asks Who Needs Analysts After Biggest Flub    
Michael Tsang and Eric Martin                                                                                                          
Bloomberg, April 7 2008
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601109&sid=anstoKu002tE&

Wednesday, April 09, 2008 | 07:07 AM | Permalink | Comments (31) | TrackBack (0)
de.li.cious add to de.li.cious | digg digg this! | technorati add to technorati | email email this post

bn-image

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341c52a953ef00e551b8f4958833

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference How Cheap Are Stocks ?:

Comments

Cycles have troughs. Don't need a graph to see that all the external signals, (i.e., consumer sentiment, decreased spending, rising unemployment, higher input costs) cannot help but curtail earnings for several quarters at least. I believe stocks aren't cheap enough because I don't see earnings power in the future. Good article on a subject that has been perplexing me recently.

Posted by: bonghiteric | Apr 9, 2008 7:42:42 AM

The comments to this entry are closed.



Recent Posts

December 2008
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
  1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31      

Archives

Complete Archives List

Blogroll

Blogroll

Category Cloud

On the Nightstand

On the Nightstand

 Subscribe in a reader

Get The Big Picture!
Enter your email address:


Read our privacy policy

Essays & Effluvia

The Apprenticed Investor

Apprenticed Investor

About Me

About Me
email me

Favorite Posts

Tools and Feeds

AddThis Social Bookmark Button

Add to Google Reader or Homepage

Subscribe to The Big Picture

Powered by FeedBurner

Add to Technorati Favorites

FeedBurner


My Wishlist

Worth Perusing

Worth Perusing

mp3s Spinning

MP3s Spinning

My Photo

Disclaimer

Disclaimer

Odds & Ends

Site by Moxie Design Studios™

FeedBurner