Thursday, February 03, 2005

House Concurrent Resolution 16, 116th General Assembly, 1985-1986 Session: he official State Rock Song, Hang On Sloopy

“A resolution is a formal expression of the Ohio General Assembly and does not require the signature of the Governor. A concurrent resolution requires the approval of both houses of the General Assembly but is not filed with the Secretary of State. The official State Rock Song, Hang On Sloopy, was enacted through House Concurrent Resolution 16, 116th General Assembly, 1985-1986 Session."

Here’s the actual Resolution. Read it. It’s great:

“WHEREAS, The members of the 116th General Assembly of Ohio wish to recognize the rock song "Hang On Sloopy" as the official rock song of the great State of Ohio; and

WHEREAS, In 1965, an Ohio-based rock group known as the McCoys reached the top of the national record charts with "Hang On Sloopy," … and that same year, John Tagenhorst, then an arranger for the Ohio State University Marching Band, created the band's now-famous arrangement of "Sloopy," first performed at the Ohio State-Illinois football game on October 9, 1965; and

 

WHEREAS, Rock music has become an integral part of American culture, having attained a degree of acceptance no one would have thought possible twenty years ago; and

 

WHEREAS, Adoption of "Hang On Sloopy" as the official rock song of Ohio is in no way intended to supplant "Beautiful Ohio" as the official state song, but would serve as a companion piece to that old chestnut; and

 

WHEREAS, If fans of jazz, country-and-western, classical, Hawaiian and polka music think those styles also should be recognized by the state, then by golly, they can push their own resolution just like we're doing; and

 

WHEREAS, "Hang On Sloopy" is of particular relevance to members of the Baby Boom Generation, who were once dismissed as a bunch of long-haired, crazy kids, but who now are old enough and vote in sufficient numbers to be taken quite seriously; and

 

WHEREAS, Adoption of this resolution will not take too long, cost the state anything, or affect the quality of life in this state to any appreciable degree, and if we in the legislature just go ahead and pass the darn thing, we can get on with more important stuff; and

 

WHEREAS, Sloopy lives in a very bad part of town, and everybody, yeah, tries to put my Sloopy down; and

 

WHEREAS, Sloopy, I don't care what your daddy do, 'cause you know, Sloopy girl, I'm in love with you; therefore be it

 

Resolved, That we, the members of the 116th General Assembly of Ohio, in adopting this Resolution, name “Hang on Sloopy as the official rock song of the State of Ohio.”


Really, that's the resolution as passed by the Ohio General Assembly . . .

Posted at 09:33 AM in Humor, Music | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Wednesday, February 02, 2005

Learn to Master the Hairy, Beastly, POORLY DESIGNED S.U.V.

How poorly designed are SUVs?

Consider this public service advert, aimed at young males who now can afford a used -- "pre-owned" in auto dealer parlance -- monster truck.

Because of their poor handling characteristics -- much longer braking distances, unstable emergency manuevers, high center of gravity, and roll over tendencies -- they have a rasther disconcerting habit of, um, killing the people who drive them.

Before suggesting that a little cleaning of the gene pool might be constructive  --  its true that SUVs have terrible stats for "one vehicle fatalities," i.e., people killing themselves without any other driver plowing into them -- there are the other unfortunate SUV stats. These vehicles disproportionately take other innocent drivers with them as they careen down the statistical highways.

Solution:   Encourage young males to achieve a "mastery" of their vehicles, ala Star Wars:

Adcospan_1


Here's the NYT take on it:

SPORT utility vehicles are beastly, or at least beastlike. 

That is the message of a new public service campaign from the governments of the 50 states and the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. The $27 million campaign, paid for with settlement money from a lawsuit against the Ford Motor Company, starts this week and is aimed at informing young men in particular about the rollover risks of sport utility vehicles. 

This latest dent to the aura of the S.U.V. stars "Esuvee," who looks like a cross between the Star Wars characters Chewbacca and Jabba the Hutt, with headlights for eyes and a grille for a nose. Esuvee - pronounced "S.U.V." - also rides like a bucking bull. 

In a 60-second commercial that is part of the campaign and will appear before movies in theaters, young men mount Esuvee, "buckling in" to the back of the hairy beast in a sort of mock bull riding championship. A gate opens and they hang on for the ride. As the first rider vaults out of control, the camera settles on a seasoned rider offering ringside advice. 

A creative (if somewhat cynical) solution to a ridiculous problem . . .   
 

Source:
The S.U.V. Is a Beast, and It's Hairy, Too
Danny Hakim
NYT, February 2, 2005
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/02/02/business/media/02adco.html 
 
EsUVee
http://www.esuvee.com/flash.htm

Posted at 06:54 AM in Design, Media | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Tuesday, February 01, 2005

260 Attacks in Iraq on Election Day

We previously noted that the WSJ had reported that U.S. officials recorded more than 175 attacks on sites in Iraq on election day. 

Now, we hear from the Washington Post that this number increased by nearly 50%:

"Across the country, insurgents launched 260 attacks against targets of all kinds, including U.S. military and Iraqi security forces, officials said. Yet the casualty count -- 45 dead, about 100 wounded -- did not rank among the highest one-day totals."

Iraqi Voting Sites Attacked

Iraq_wp_013105_1




Source:
Insurgents Attacked, but Voters Persevered
Resolute Electorate, Blanket Security Thwarted Onslaught
Karl Vick
Washington Post Foreign Service, Tuesday, February 1, 2005; Page A11
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A52500-2005Jan31.html

Posted at 04:01 PM in War/Defense | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack